Showing posts with label dark fiction. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dark fiction. Show all posts

Saturday, September 14, 2019

OMG! I finally fit in a genre! 😝

For all the times I complained about not wanting to be stuck in a genre, I've finally found the perfect one!

Ever since my first book, I've never been comfortable classifying any of my books into a specific category. Nothing ever quite fit. There was romance, action, suspense, murder, dark humor and even some vampires thrown in a couple, but none of these specific genres felt right. It was as though all my books included so many things that it was kind of difficult to really categorize them properly so I chose instead to toss everything into the 'dark fiction' category. It seemed like the most accurate, if not the best category.

Recently, I stumbled across the concept of 'counterculture' and I was immediately intrigued. What was that exactly and why did it sound so appealing? As turns out, counterculture tends to be a way of life that goes against social 'norms'. This demographic rejects 'conventional' society choosing instead to live by their own standards.

This grabbed my attention.

In my first two books (Fire and A Spark before the Fire) my characters reject the values of society by striving to become rock stars, which in itself, tends to be a very counterculture lifestyle.

In my third and fourth book, The Rock Star of Vampires and Her Name is Mariah, I tackle the underground world of vampires. You can't get much more counterculture than that, can you?

Maybe so.

In my current series, my cast of characters tends to go against pretty much all social norms. They make their own laws, follow their own rules and do so without a second thought. Murder, corruption, collusion, and torture are engrained into their lives as if they were the most natural thing. That's pretty counterculture.

My books finally have a home and it's pretty awesome.


Monday, August 12, 2019

Writing about characters that are vastly different from you 🀫

Different ethnicities, the opposite sex, and even vampires; is it difficult to write about characters that are different from you?

The truth is that we're usually writing about characters that aren't necessarily like ourselves. It doesn't matter if the character is the same ethnicity, age and has the same profession as you in a fictional novel, chances are that he/she still isn't quite like you. In fact, if the character did completely relate to you in every way then your book is actually autobiographical, not fiction. 

In my first book, Fire, I wrote about a young, blonde, white woman named Tarah. Many people seemed to draw a parallel between her and I because we had a similar physical description. However, that's where the similarities ended. Her story was vastly different from mine, therefore, I had to dive deep into my imagination to connect with this protagonist. She was a musician turned rock star, in an industry, and with experiences, I knew nothing about. Her life was vastly different from my own at that age. 

Following this book, I wrote A Spark before the Fire, which followed a teenaged, male character who had been featured in Fire. Originally, I feared that this was way out of my comfort zone. After all, how could I write from the voice of a male teenager? Where would I even start?

As it turns out, I had no problem. As soon as I started to write, the inner dialogue and actions of this young man flowed very naturally. It was very instinctual and, in fact, that's been my process as I continue to write about characters that are vastly different from me. I've since written about vampires, narcos, assassins, children, and people of various ethnicities, ages, and sexual preferences. The key is to really listen for the character's voice and it will tell you everything you have to know. 

How do you do that? I would recommend that you find a quiet place and time to do your writing and really focus on your inner voice. Stay calm, stay centered and just start writing. If your instinct is to write about a specific character, chances are they're ready to come out and play.

Saturday, August 3, 2019

Dialogue that pops! πŸ˜‰

The sure sign of great dialogue is when readers start to quote lines from your books. Most of the time, this is something a character says but other time, it's just a general comment within the story. That's when you know you're on the right track!

We've all had friends quoting characters from their favorite television shows and movies. There are lines that are almost as legendary as the programs they're from and yet, some people aren't aware of what's involved in writing great dialogue. There are a few things you should consider.

1. Keep it fresh. We don't need to hear the same lines that are already overused in television, books, and movies. The only exception is when it's being used on purpose to be ironic. For example, in The Devil May Lie, there's a point when Jorge Hernandez, a bloodthirsty criminal, quotes a line from I Love Lucy that greatly contradicts the lighthearted comedy from the '50s. In fact, I think he might even have a gun to someone's head when he uses the line, "Lucy, you got some splainin' to do."

2. Keep it interesting. Let's avoid the same boring conversations you'd have with your great aunt at a wedding. Avoid talking about the weather (unless it's relevant) and the "hi, how are you?" dialogue, if at all possible. I would only use something like this if you're purposely trying to show awkwardness in a conversation. People are bored enough in real-life conversations, so keep your character's dialogue as interesting as possible.

3. Don't ramble. I'm the queen on rambling (which you'll know if you ever watched my YouTube channel 😝) but when it comes to characters, make them get right to the point. Don't beat around the bush. The thing about characters is that their time is restricted to some many pages, so you have to get everything packed in tight like a suitcase about to be weighed at the airport. Don't bring boring shoes you don't need.

4. Remember each character has his/her own dialogue pattern. Your best friend or crazy aunt use specific words, speak in a certain manner and respond in a predictable way. For example, I once worked with a girl who never went to the 'bathroom' but the 'facilities'. Some people pronounce certain words incorrectly, others use a lot of slang or swearing in their conversations. Depending on where they live, their status and first language, you might expect vastly different dialogue patterns. Someone who grew up in the UK, for example, may use a word that has a vastly different meaning in North America. A middle-aged woman who works in an office setting may speak differently than a 20-year-old man who works in a garage. Many of my characters are from Latino countries so it's not uncommon for a little Spanish to get mixed into their conversations.

5. Don't overthink conversations. Just like in real life, if you overthink a conversation or speech, it tends to sound too stiff. The same goes for characters. Stay balanced and go with the flow when writing dialogue. See where it takes you. Sometimes, it might actually move the story in an unexpected direction and as I always say, if you don't expect things to go a certain way, neither does the reader!

In the end, you want sharp dialogue that's dramatic and honest. Make the conversation pop!


Saturday, June 29, 2019

Why is the first paragraph so important? πŸ€“

You know what they say about first impressions? Especially in today's world where everything is fast-paced and people are much too rushed to give much of anything a second try, it's more important than ever to capture a reader quickly...but what does that mean exactly?

The obvious answer is to have an engaging first chapter. This doesn't mean it has to be perfect. It also doesn't mean it has to be over the top or gimmicky. What it means is that you want the reader to get a sense of what they're getting themselves into. What is the theme of this book? What kind of genre does it fall under?

As a writer, the first paragraph is like meeting someone new for the first time. If you want to make a good impression, you'll probably throw on some makeup, hopefully, some clean clothes and put a little extra attention on your hair. With books, it's really about pulling someone in and showing them a glimpse into your character's world.



As an example, in my 11th book, The Devil May Lie, I talk about power in the first paragraph or more specifically, the importance of power in our world. What does it mean? Why do people want it? I talk about how 'it starts when we're children on the playground and ends in our death'. I also say 'we lust after it as if it were the flesh of a lover'. I use specific words that are powerful as well - bold, passion, addictive, crave, roaring fire - these are words that give readers a sense of what is to come. If I were writing something about something with more of a romantic theme, I would probably choose some powerful words like 'passionate' but also gentle words that give the impression of a soft place to fall, such as comfort and warmth, things we associate with love.

Also, another thing I want to note is that I often connect the first paragraph in chapter one with the first paragraph in the final chapter (in my case, chapter 50). So once again, in The Devil May Lie, I talk about power in the last chapter. This is important because we're kind of revisiting the place we started with to see where we are on the same topic. In this last paragraph, I ask the question when do we have enough power? 'When do we cross the line? Who wins when there's nothing left to take?' My hope is that after having read the entire book, this gives you something to ponder.

The first paragraph should give readers an impression of what they can expect. Of course, you have to remember that like any relationship, you must work hard to keep the reader interested throughout the book and to live up to that first impression.




Sunday, June 16, 2019

Why my characters aren't shooting as many people 😱

Here's a spoiler alert 🚨- if you haven't already read my books, you should know that there's usually a body count. 😲I'm attempting to get away from having my characters using guns but does that mean my books are becoming less violent and why am I making these changes?

First of all, I'm tired of guns. Between mass shootings, the vast amount of television shows using them (more shows than not, I'm guessing...) and of course video games, I thought maybe we could use a bit of a break from guns.

Does that mean my books are less violent? No. In fact, I'm actually trying to find more creative ways for my characters to either get revenge, attack or hurt their adversaries without using a revolver. This isn't to say the gang in my series has tossed their guns aside, quite the contrary. I feel that they're used so often in movies, television, and books that perhaps it's time to find more interesting methods rather than relying on the easiest, most thoughtless and overused options in fiction.

In many ways, we're desensitized by guns. When a character pulls out a gun in your favorite piece of fiction or Netflix show, we hardly blink an eye because it's the norm. Sadly, it doesn't pack the same punch as it should and in turn, this doesn't keep readers or viewers on high alert. You know what keeps viewers on high alert? A machete. An ax. A chainsaw. One must be creative.

I also believe there is a certain amount of passion when a character attacks his or her victims with a more barbaric weapon. In reality, guns are somewhat lazy, when you think about it.

If you're one of my readers, don't expect things to calm down and you won't suddenly find my books in a Christian book store but you might find a few other surprises. 😏







Sunday, June 2, 2019

Let's talk about the conspiracy theories in my books 😱

My readers know to expect a few conspiracy theories in my books; but how did it get started and why do I do it?

One of my strongest motivations as a writer has always been to make people think. I know other authors are content to entertain, warm hearts and create hope with their readers; so in many ways, I guess I kind of do the complete opposite. Where other books might be a soft place to fall at the end of the day, I prefer to introduce topics that instead make my readers think, wonder and consider.

This is not to say that any conspiracy theories brought up in my books are right or wrong. In most cases, they work well with the story and cause a little more intrigue, leaving the reader some food for thought. I think it adds an element of excitement to the book and also gets the reader more involved in the story. I believe if a reader feels more involved in the story, it helps to make them feel more connected with the characters and really, isn't this what it's all about?

In the end, I'm not trying to change anyone's mind but in a world where we are conditioned to feel and assume certain things about certain topics, I think it's kind of neat to shake things up.


Friday, April 12, 2019

Do your books have social commentary? 🧐

The world is a hot mess right now so if there ever was a time for social commentary in the arts, this would be it!

I've always been a fan of social commentary in books, movies, television, and music. In fact, for me its an important part of the writing process. I love the idea of planting a few seeds for readers to ponder. I'm not doing so to change their mind but rather, to give them some food for thought. Quite often we get locked in our opinions and stubbornly refuse to see the other side but can we make a fair decision if we don't? 

When it comes to the arts, books, movies, and television are sometimes a more tangible way to process information. News stories and documentaries are often slanted, possibly more with the concern of capturing ratings. However, fictional works show the emotional side of some difficult subjects. The human being behind societal problems has a face. As they say, before you judge, walk a mile in someone else's shoes. Books, movies, and television allow you to do so.

Having said that, there are various topics and questions that writers will bring to light for the reader's consideration. For example, in my book The Devil May Lie, Paige NoΓ«l-Hernandez has concerns about her weight and references a recent magazine article that suggests women 'her age' have to work twice as hard to slip back into those favorite pair of jeans. Her husband Jorge is quick to ask if this specific article was followed by a page of ads for weight loss products. Of course, we know that advertising is often targeted and in some cases, created to make potential customers more insecure about a problem that they may not have previously considered. Welcome to the world of consumerism!

As a writer, I want my readers to think. Ideally, I would love to believe that they read my books with an open mind and heart, that their ideas may be challenged or perhaps they are relating to specific comments or chapters. I hope that the characters stay with them long after finishing the book and maybe even inspired them. I guess I want to believe that my books shake things up a bit; whether it be the reader's ideology, imagination or how they see themselves. 



Friday, February 8, 2019

Animals and Devils 🐺😈


If you're familiar with my series, you probably already noticed that the books have an animal and devil theme in the titles. But why is that?

As I talked about in previous videos, this became the series that was never meant to be a series. It started out with a book called We're All Animals in 2016 and took off with the follow-up, Always be a Wolf a few months later. This portion of the series follows protagonist Chase Jacobs who's a naive, small-town boy who has a tendency of trying to do the right thing.

And that's when things take a bit of a turn.

In the fall of 2017, the devil-themed titles start appropriately with the blood-thirsty thug Jorge Hernandez as the protagonist. The Devil is Smooth Like Honey followed the life of the Mexican narco who's about to take over the legalized pot industry in Canada. While Chase was very much the boy-next-door, Jorge is the complete opposite, demonstrating the vast differences in characters. Having Chase as an employee, both men tend to have an influence on one another as the series continues with A Devil Named Hernandez and And the Devil Will Laugh.

I've always said that I love character contrasts in books and feel that extremes have a way of balancing each other out. I'm really curious where this is going to go in the future because I see an interesting shift in both of these characters in my next book. Will Jorge bring out the bad in Chase and Chase bring out the good in Jorge or are certain aspects in their DNA to stay? What do you think?



Friday, January 18, 2019

The loyalty factor πŸ‘ŠπŸΌ

One of the aspects that I think people find most appealing about my current series is the loyalty factor. Actually, as the writer, this is one of the aspects that I like the best too. There's something to be said about a group of people who can trust each other, literally, with their life. We find comfort when watching or reading about these relationships because loyalty is a trait we respect.

I feel that in today's society people don't necessarily feel that they have loyalty in their lives. If we're lucky, we might have a very small group of people that we would even put in that category and even then, many of us have also fallen into the 'blind faith' scenario, only to find ourselves shocked when someone lets us down. We've seen the disappointment in relationships, friendships, employers and family, just to name a few. To a point, loyalty might not only be a hot commodity but it might also feel like a rare one, making it even more precious.

When I think about shows that have been popular over the years, I notice that character's loyalty to one another has been prevalent. It doesn't matter if it's friends living together or a group of gangster/mobster characters, the basis of their relationship is often loyalty whether the protagonist is dealing with a broken heart or a broken body. It doesn't matter if these relationships are dysfunctional most of the time; what matters is that when needed, these people show up for one another.

I'm not sure if this is a trait that can often be explored in books since loyalty is something that is best demonstrated over time. The beauty of writing a series is that I've had the opportunity to create and show the strength of these relationships through situations that put the characters to the test. And when you think about it, real life isn't all that different.




Saturday, September 15, 2018

Why do we love the anti-hero? πŸ”ͺ

Oh, those bad boys and girls! Don't we love them?

There's just something about the rebellion and going against the grain character that we love. Perhaps it is the fact that these characters sometimes do what we wish we could in real life? Is it because we get a small thrill about 'sticking it to the man'? Is there something attractive or sexy about the character that thumbs their nose at the world? What is the draw to this character?

When most of us were children, we were often given the impression that there were 'good' and 'bad' guys in life. The good guys could be trusted. The bad guys should be avoided. It was pretty simple and to the point. Bad guys always had mustaches and looked shady, while good guys wore a suit of some kind of 'respectable' uniform (so, like, not the one from when you flipped burgers in college).

However, if life teaches us anything (especially now that the Internet sheds light on a lot of dark corners) it is that the lines in the sand aren't always so clear. Maybe the religious figure from your youth turned out to be a pedophile or you witnessed a cop beat the crap out of an innocent citizen. Whatever it was, you may now have a slight aversion to what you once viewed as the 'good guy' and find yourself slightly intrigued by the 'bad guy', therefore making you drawn to characters who don't exactly play by the rules.

Of course, I could be overanalyzing. Maybe we just like watching bombs blowing up everywhere and some devilish character pushing the button. What do you think? Why do you love the antihero (assuming you do)? Maybe the answer might surprise you.


Tuesday, September 11, 2018

What are my books about? πŸ€”

One of the most common questions I get asked is what my books are about. I always struggle to answer this question because it's really difficult to accurately sum up all my books in a few short sentences. So, here goes.

My books tend to be dark fiction. I cover a lot of topics in my stories, especially areas that are controversial like Big Pharma, corruption, collusion, racist and white supremacy, just to name a few. I want to give readers something to think about, to consider as well as also entertain.

I make it a point to have my books move along quickly. A lot of novels are kind of slow and steady but I feel like people want to be grabbed by the throat and pulled right into the story. People are used to watching fast-paced television shows with a lot of drama, a lot of characters and non-stop action, so in my mind, books must compete. When I'm writing my books, I see them like a television show running in my head, so I write them accordingly. I believe that is where books are going in the future.


So what do I write about? I like to think I write about cool topics; vampires, rock stars, gangsters, all the sexy areas the top television shows centre on. We love the antihero these days much more than we love the boy next door. We love characters that jump off the page, that are full of passion and excitement. And why should we settle for anything less? 

My books are for people who like to be challenged and love action. I can tell you one thing for sure; I don't write books that your grandmother's going to be reading. 🀭

Sunday, September 9, 2018

What order should I read your books? πŸ“š

People often ask in what order they should read my books. Although I think most are standalone, I will break things down for those who are just checking them out for the first time. ☺️Here goes....

The Rock Star series:

Fire (2010)
A Spark before the Fire (2012)

The Vampire series:

The Rock Star of Vampires (2014)
Her Name is Mariah (2015)









Different Shades of the Same Color (2016)



The Hernandez/Gangster series:

We're All Animals (2016)
Always be a Wolf (2017)
The Devil is Smooth Like Honey (2017)
A Devil Named Hernandez (2018)
And the Devil Will Laugh (2018)

You'll notice that Different Shades of the Same Color kind of sits alone. There is a slight connection to my current (gangster) series it is a minor one. One of the characters from my current series was briefly mentioned in a couple of chapters of this book but that's about it. It's kind of the weirdo book that doesn't really have a place on the list.

I always encourage people to go online to learn about each book, read a chapter and see which one speaks to them. My writing is dark fiction, including graphic sex, violence, and inner conflicts. Oh, and there's some dark comedy in there too. πŸ˜‰




Why did I start writing? 🀨

Probably one of the most common questions that I'm asked is why I started writing. After all, I was in college studying business in 2008 when I suddenly dropped out to pursue my dream. It was definitely the road less traveled and to some, it probably seemed stupid to return to a dead-end job while I wrote my first book but to me, it was what I had to do.

There are a few reasons why writing quickly became my passion.

  1.  I wasn't finding the kind of books that I wanted to read so I wrote them. Not to suggest there's nothing out there that I enjoy reading but it was more to the point that there was just something missing. 
  2. I wanted to make people see another point of view. Let's explore the other side of things. For example, in my first book Fire, I talk about a rock band's rise to fame and the unexpected negative side that came with instant fame. In my vampire books, I question whether these mystical creatures of fantasy are actually everyday people who happen have some fascinating strengths. And in my recent series about gangsters, I ask whether or not we are clear who the 'good' and 'bad' guys are anymore. There are sometimes some very grey areas.
  3. I wanted to make people think. Corruption, collusion, racism, white supremacy, Big Pharma, celebrity, untrustworthy corporations....you will see many topics and issues brought up in my books, even if it's merely a passing comment by a character. My goal is to make people think and look at things from a character's perspective rather than the often, black and white version we see on the news. 
  4. To discover a magical world. Sometimes I'm shocked by what my character's do. In fact, I'm always fascinated where the story will take me and just like many of my readers, I can't wait to see what they will do next!




Tuesday, August 14, 2018

And The Devil Will Laugh 😈

The latest book in the Hernandez series! 😈😈😈Check out And The Devil Will Laugh



Jorge Hernandez is a driven man. What he sets his mind on he goes after relentlessly, and doesn't care if he leaves his adversaries in body bags or covered in pools of blood.

He's ruthless and determined to stake a claim on the Canadian legal marijuana industry. Government operated or privately owned, he and his loyal foot-soldiers will muscle in and tear off a big chunk of it for themselves.

His sinister ambitions aren't limited to the pot business. He's also got dreams of making a splash in the political realm.

Unfortunately, if you're rattling a few cages some very unsavory characters will take notice.

But Jorge is more than a match for whoever takes him on - whether it be muck-raking journalists or political opponents who want to challenge the candidate he bought and paid for. Those who oppose him quickly learn he makes a formidable enemy.
Politicians, police or white supremacists, nothing stands in his way because Jorge Hernandez always wins.


The angels may sing in heaven but here on earth, the devil will laugh. 

Watch Mima talk about this book.


And learn about some of the topics brought up in this book.




Monday, October 2, 2017

The Series that Wasn't Meant to be a Series 🀭

When I started the book We're All Animals back in 2016, I really hadn't anticipated that it would turn into the series it has become. Now with the recent release of the third book (and having started the fourth), I recognize that maybe it is time to let people know about the series and the best order to read these books. So, here we go...

It started with a broken heart and it took no time for Chase Jacobs' world to spin out of control. An unwanted pregnancy allows his mother and obsessive future bride to manipulate and control his life, turning him bitter and resentful. His destiny becomes a dark road to misery and whenever he tries to take the wheel, temptation only leads him further astray.

When a provocative and sinister side of life introduces itself, Chase discovers there's an animal lurking inside each of us; a powerful creature that wants to take over. But will he let it win?



Check out the CBC interview here.


Check out the YouTube video here.







The second book in the series is Always be a Wolf, published in April 2017. 




In the gripping sequel to We're All Animals, Chase Jacobs moves to Toronto with his Colombian bosses, Diego and Jolene Silva, where they expand their elite sex party business. The underground's best-kept secret is going legit, but just as Chase starts a brand new life, tragedy strikes.
The heartbreaking lessons ahead of him are the most difficult he's ever had to face, and Chase must rely on his new family to help him through. But will his blind faith in Diego and Jolene prove to be a mistake, and has he underestimated just how far they are willing to go to prove their loyalty?
He learns there are times when passion and anger cause you to throw away the rule book even in the face of deadly consequences. He learns that words have a great deal of power but not as much power as silence. But most of all, Chase learns that in a world full of sheep, one should always be a wolf.


Check out the YouTube video here.





The third book in this series was published in the fall of 2017 and is called The Devil is Smooth like Honey



El narco. A monster. Un diablo. Jorge Hernandez had been called many things, and it always made him laugh. If there was one word that could be used to describe him, it would be untouchable. Corrupt politicians combined with his charming disposition had contributed to Jorge’s success, but it was often the underlying threats behind his handsome smile that sealed the deal. He was unstoppable.

In Paige NoΓ«l, he had met his match. She was a woman as dangerous and sadistic as she was soft and gentle. The last thing he expected was to propose after an explosive first meeting, but the intense fire between them was as addictive as the thrill of violence and power.

When some of his personal enemies turn up dead, Jorge shuffles his daughter into a Canadian school, deciding that things are getting a little too hot in Mexico; but does life ever slow down in this dark underground world?

The devil is smooth like honey, but is heaven ever far away?


Check out the CBC interview here.

Check out the YouTube video here.


The fourth book is A Devil Named Hernandez


In the thrilling sequel to The Devil Is Smooth like Honey, Jorge Hernandez is muscling in on the Canadian marijuana industry, unleashing the same savagery that made him a big player in the Mexican drug cartel. Whether its controlling politicians and government officials or using intimidation and violence to get what he wants, few people dare stand in his way. Although he takes on his enemies with a deceptive ease, it only takes a single threat to his family to bring out the demon inside of him. Fueled by blinding rage, he attacks with a relentless brutality, showing no remorse and offering no mercy. In a world tainted by racism, corruption, and greed, he proves once again there is a devil, and his name is Jorge Hernandez.


In this eye-opening look into the life of the silver-tongued Mexican fox, you find yourself rooting for the society's underbelly, as sex, drugs, and death intermix with family, love, and friendship (Amazon review).


Check out the CBC interview here






To learn more about my writing, please go to www.mimaonfire.com or check out my YouTube channel!


Sunday, September 13, 2015

Are we the Characters? πŸ™ƒ

It would be fair to say that each of my books follows me on my own, personal journey through life. Not to suggest that I am my characters, but I certainly have learned some of the same lessons along the way.



My first book Fire was as much about the power of mass media as that of my characters, a rock band in the 90s. It was about how the value of life often comes second to the value of a great story and ratings/sales. This was a realization that I came to during my twenties when mass media often had the most influence. 

 My second book was the sequel called A Spark before the Fire, following a rebellious, social misfit that felt like he was on the outside, looking in, which also was a strong reflection of how I viewed the world at that time. I always felt a sense of being left behind, not included or as if my value was below that of others and like Jimmy Groome, chose self-destructive ways to block what I could not handle. 

My third book, The Rock Star of Vampires, displayed how many of the social ‘vultures’ of the world are often carefully hiding behind a beautiful mask and it reflected a time when I realized that we all have our many sides and vulnerabilities, regardless of what we try to display to others. 

My fourth book, Her Name is Mariah, was probably my most personal book, that hit closest to home. Let me explain why.

Mariah Nichols was a character resurrected from my third book, The Rock Star of Vampires. It told the story of a strong, often cold woman who was tough – or so she wanted the world to believe. Mariah was one of the people hiding behind the beautiful mask I described earlier, except that she even believed the performance she gave to the world. She was untouchable. She was the wolf among sheep. No one could get to her. No one could hurt her.

The reality was that a young doctor comes into her life and shakes up everything she has ever believed about both the world and herself. He slowly breaks down every wall that surrounded her, causing Mariah to be faced with her true self for the first time ever: it's overwhelming. His role in her life was to destroy all the walls that prevented her from growing, from living and most of all, from loving. In this case, she has to hit rock bottom, to evolve and feel truly alive.

This was very much my own story. 

No, I didn’t have a charming, handsome doctor come into my life and force me to see a side of myself I had long decided to ignore, however, I did have someone who forced me to take a good look at myself and it was by far, the most torturous and excruciating experience, but it was one that I had to explore in order to get to a better place. In fact, when I look at whom I used to be - how I once viewed the world or my negative thought process - I almost don’t recognize that person at all. It was my much-needed spiritual awakening. 


I’ve almost completed the rough draft of my latest book and I'm definitely putting a lot of myself and my experiences in this book. Although slightly altered (and hopefully much more interesting than my own story) I do see the world through my character’s eyes and hope I continue to do so.

I've always said that my books are for the 'misfits, the nonconformists and those who never quite fit in' because that is what I believe. I like to write unconventional stories about unconventional characters, who like to color outside the lines. Not only do they like it, they don't know any other way to live.






Canadian author Mima is known for complicated and diverse characters, her dark style and for never shying away from controversial topics. To request an interview or if you are interested in doing a book review, please send requests here
 


Mima is the author of Fire and the prequel, A Spark before the Fire, as well as The Rock Star of Vampires  Her Name is Mariah and Different Shades of the Same Color. Join Mima on Facebook, TwitterG+ and Goodreads also, check out her Amazon Author Page

For some reading, check out her blogs – personal or writing


Don’t let the fun stop here - sign up for the newsletter!